Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:45pm EST
obey the established laws. so that is what needs to be accounted for. these institutions in the ideologicideologic al heterogeneity that they bring. the book's explanation of how the past became the present question says mark mentions many widely held assumptions. the reason is simple. typical narratives, common conceptions of change over time and ordinary historical methodologies cannot answer the book central question. they fail to do justice to the full range of moral and metaphysical commitment encompassed under the first-person plural, we. when it is used inclusively have all present-day europeans and the americans. who are we? we should not underestimate the importance of this question and the content of the answer. predominant large-scale historical narratives in which catholicism is thought to have been superceded by the protestant reformation which was in turn superceded by enlightened modernity only to be superceded in turn by the postmodern present would seem to imply that now we are all secular skeptical fragmented selves that we are not. i am not and i suspect that
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2013 10:00pm EST
visit my father at law school and we would go out to dinner and he and bobby would sit there and talks about the existential issues suffering so dramatically from the assassination of jack kennedy to talk about issues of do you believe in god. i remember vividly i remember to me that opened with my father not on the policy level but on a personal level. >> something to touch on he was also right tea film reviews. and it just does drop to have him give me a chapter and verse about the structure he was the forest, but not the bad way the spending the us numbers at the cape but had told in the wintertime but the letter that comes solid even when he pulls out the stiletto in a graceful way you always know where you stand a and we were talking earlier as happily as the man could he was in the stakeout is in manhattan. [laughter] the civility question is interesting in the earlier volumes that steve been edited he had lunch with kissinger and but to say quite different things of buckley. [laughter] but one thing. >> one of the it vintages of this book over a 50 year period. him in buckley us
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:45am EST
government in its modern form. the stagecoaches would hire lobbyists to pass a law to say that railroads could not go faster than a horse. [laughter] because it's an unfair competitive advantage. [laughter] you may think i'm exaggerating. in the 1920s the newspapers got congress to pass a law that made it illegal to have radio news. [laughter] broke down in the 1930s, but there was a brief period when you could not legally have radio news. because, you know, people protect their own self-interest is. very few people go out voluntarily, give up their interest for the greater good. and that's why you have this constant tension between pioneers of the to future and the prison guards of the past. now, one of the areas that's going to become the most fascinating is online learning. this is being streamed on youtube, for example, tonight. well, one of my favorite examples is right here in california. there's a -- and, again, when you talk about pioneers of the to future, just as henry ford was amazing and edison was amazing, the wright brothers were amazing, there are people wandering around t
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am EST
used to visit my father when i was at law school when he was living in new york and i was living in cambridge, and he would take us -- he would often take bobby and myself and others out to dinner. and he and bobby would be sitting there talking about existential issues, about the issue of -- because his brother still suffered so dramatically from the assassination of jack kennedy. he would talk about issues like whether he still believed in god. i remember being privy to these conversations, and my father was the kind of person almost like a counselor to kennedy, that he would be willing to be that open with my tower and seek -- my father and seek his advice not just on a policy level, but also on a personal level. >> one of the things we haven't touched on, jon, is that when he was a white house counsel to the president and kind of an in-house historian keeping track, he was also writing film reviews. john was not kidding when he talked about having correspondence with groucho marx. i loved to go to dinner with him if for no ore reason than -- other reason than to drop the name of
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:00am EST
, parties had a more significant role because the campaign finance laws were quite a bit different. unfortunately, the citizens united supreme court decision has really changed the impact that political parties have because now you have this unaccountable, opaque, corporate-infused invasion of corporate donations where they're drowning campaigns and candidates in unaccountable money, and it's really unfortunate. it's actually, puts campaigns up for sale even more than campaign finance left -- >> host: does that hurt the dnc and the rnc when it comes to fundraising? >> guest: no. i think we are -- i know at the dnc we've just had our best two months in online fundraising in our history, and that's particularly because i think people are really tired of the gridlock, tired of the tea party being allowed to control the agenda, shutting the government down, being willing to hold the economy hostage all in the name of getting their way on the issues that they care, you know, that matter to them like repealing the affordable care act. i think people look at them as irresponsible because
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am EST
similarities. obama is very cerebral. he is an academic, taught at law school if you wish chicago. in kennedy published books, wrote books. obama wrote books, editing it is a certain affinity for this kind of -- now kennedy was i think he was never a glad hander, and certainly obama is not a glad handed. i sat next to that one did and there's no smalltalk. he's really very serious and it's all business all the time, and that's fine with me. i'm academic, too, but kennedy never really liked that kind of traditional boston, how is your grandma and your uncle so-and-so? he never liked engaging in that kind of chatter. and i think obama is very serious about what he -- and, of course, the knock on him has been that he hasn't cultivated the people in congress the way lyndon johnson did. because johnson was the guy who was pressed the flesh, and somebody once said when lyndon back to into a and began breaking into your mouth you knew you were finished. [laughter] so a very, very different style, you see, and i think obama is a lot more like kennedy then compared to johnson. >> now, are ther
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 12:15am EST
again. we have the affordable care act and it's the law of the land that both sides need to start talking about how we perform this to make it work to make it better because i will tom a conservative and libertarian friends walking -- watching who say we don't need health care and of course they say the same time don't touch medicare. and their kids are signing up at the same time. the idea could do nothing and go ' doing nothing before the health care act is pure nonsense. what happens is when a poor mother takes her two children into the emergency room at 11:00 at night guess what? that is not a free lunch. we all pay for them exactly pay for it so it ends up costing the most money. we have got to do this all over again and we got to do it rationally and we are going to have to join arms together republicans and democrats alike are going to have to come up with a compromise that works for all americans. [applause] >> joe? one more question. >> you got to sign books and go to politico. >> i'm going to answer these questions very quickly. >> iowa and new hampshire and south caroli
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7